Cambridge Truck |8242 Georgetown RdCambridgeOH43725 | (740) 255-5200
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Cambridge Truck
8242 Georgetown Rd
CambridgeOH 43725
 (740) 255-5200
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Truck Camping Throughout the Years

Truck Camping Throughout the Years

Truck campers give you more versatility than towing a camper trailer. When you have a truck camper, you can tow your boat, a horse trailer or anything else you may want to take with you on your vacation. Truck campers come in different sizes and allow you to be comfortable while hunting, fishing or just camping.

The History of Truck Camping

Truck campers first came on the scene in the mid-1940s. Engineers used the design of the pickup truck to design the campers. Throughout the years, truck campers have evolved significantly and now include pop-up and lightweight versions. Because of the popularity of truck campers, many manufacturers also make equipment for truck campers, such as jacks, tie downs and tops. The largest known truck camper is an 18-foot long model that rides on a Ford F550. It has removable jacks, a dishwasher and a dryer.

Equipment Needed for Truck Campers

The most important equipment you will need for your truck camper is a tie-down system. Two are available: the Torklift and the Happijac. Both are good systems, and both have pros and cons. The Torklift is stronger as it bolts to the truck's frame and is more rugged. The Happijac system requires you to drill into your truck's bed and is considered better for off-road use as it prevents side-to-side movement better than the Torklift system. Check with your camper's manufacturer to find out which system they prefer you to use with your camper.

The camper is secured to the truck with four tie-downs. Turnbuckles are required to secure the camper to the tie-downs. They all need proper installation and tension to work properly in high winds and other stresses when driving with a camper on the truck.

Additionally, a pigtail plugs the camper into the truck so you have brake lights, running lights and turn signals. It also provides juice from the truck's alternator to charge the camper's battery.

When you already have a truck, your camper choices are limited to the payload of the truck. However, if you are buying a camper and a truck, choose the camper, then pick the right pickup truck with the appropriate payload for the camper.

Because of the weight on the back of the truck, you'll also need a truck with excellent suspension and tires. Check to ensure that your tires' load rating will handle the weight of the camper. Also, make sure that the tires are properly inflated. If your truck has a weak suspension, you might consider upgrading it. The best way to determine if you need to spend this money is to drive the truck with the camper on it to see how it handles. If it's fine, then the truck's suspension is enough to handle the extra weight. Shocks, struts and springs should be in good condition and should be able to withstand the extra weight.

Choosing the Correct Truck

When you already have a truck, your camper choices are limited to the payload of the truck. However, if you are buying a camper and a truck, choose the camper, then pick the right pickup truck with the appropriate payload for the camper. This is the amount of weight that a truck can carry. The payload is usually listed on the sticker inside the driver's side door. The payload includes passengers, gear, a fully loaded truck camper, and any other materials your truck is carrying. The weight of everything should be below the payload rating for the truck.

You should also be aware of the gross axle weight rating. While both axle ratings are important, the rear axle is the most important, since most of the weight is over that one. While the axle rating may allow you to exceed the payload, that is not advisable.

Visit Cambridge Truck

To find the perfect truck for your camper, stop by Cambridge Truck to test drive the model with the appropriate payload for the camper you want.

Need a truck that can haul a heavy load? Let's talk! Contact us